Links

API Selection Filters

This section describes the conditions that act as selection criteria for choosing APIs that are eligible for a particular test. It also filters out APIs that are not eligible.
Example:
Example of API Selection filter
# THIS IS API SELECTION FILTER
api_selection_filters:
response_code:
gte: 200
lt: 300
url:
contains_either:
- login
- signin
- sign-in
- log-in
request_payload:
for_one:
key:
contains_either:
- password
- pwd
- pass
- passwd
request_headers:
for_one:
key:
contains_either: cookie
extract: header_key

Syntax

  1. 1.
    Parent Operators
  2. 2.
    Data Operators
  3. 3.
    Collection Operators
  4. 4.
    Combining Conditions using Boolean Operators

Parent Operators

Each condition block begins with a parent operator. Parent Operators indicate the property of the API you are testing. All the conditions will apply to these parent operators. Parent Operators can have the following values:
Parent Operator
Description
response_code
This denotes that the conditions will be applied on response code of the api
method
This denotes that the conditions will be applied on http method of the api
url
This denotes that the conditions will be applied on http url of the api
request_payload
This denotes that the conditions will be applied on request payload of the api
response_payload
This denotes that the conditions will be applied on response payload of the api
request_headers
This denotes that the condition will be applied on request headers of the api
response_headers
This denotes that the condition will be applied on response headers of the api
query_param
This denotes that the condition will be applied on query params of the api

Data Operators

Each Parent Operator should contain one or more Data Operators that describe the exact condition to be applied to the Parent Property. Data Operators can have the following values:
Data Operator
Expected Arguments
Description
contains_either
List/Non List
Checks whether the parent property contains the specified input. If input is an array, any one of the input element should satisfy this condition.
contains_all
List/Non List
Checks whether the parent property contains the specified input. If input is an array, all of the input element should satisfy this condition.
regex
List/Non List
Checks whether the parent property contains a match for the regex specified in the specified input. If input is an array, one of the regex input should have a match
eq
Non List
Checks whether the parent property is equal to the specified input.
neq
Non List
Checks whether the parent property is not equal equal to the specified input.
gt
Non List
Checks whether the parent property is greater than to the specified input.
gte
Non List
Checks whether the parent property is greater than equal to the specified input.
lt
Non List
Checks whether the parent property is lesser than the specified input.
lte
Non List
Checks whether the parent property is lesser than equal to to the specified input.
not_contains
List/Non List
Checks whether the parent property does not contain the specified input. If input is an array, all of the input element should satisfy this condition.
not_contains_either
List/Non List
Checks whether the parent property does not contain the specified input. If input is an array, any one of the input element should satisfy this condition.
contains_jwt
boolean
Checks whether the parent property contains/not contains a jwt token

contains_either

Checks whether the parent property contains the specified input. If input is an array, any one of the input element should satisfy this condition.
Example 1
Example of contains_either
url:
contains_either: login
# Endpoints that contain login substring would match the above condition.
# Match Example - https://xyz.com/user/login
# Invalid Example - https://xyz.com/user/register
Example 2
Example of contains_either
url:
contains_either:
- https
- login
# Endpoints that contain either https or login substring would match the above condition.
# Match Examples - https://xyz.com/user/login | https://xyz.com/user/register
# Invalid Example - http://xyz.com/user/data
👉🏻 In simple language: The above yaml syntax is filtering APIs with url containing the keywords ‘https’ or ‘login’

contains_all

Checks whether the parent property contains the specified input. If input is an array, all of the input mlelement should satisfy this condition.
Example 1
Example 1
url:
contains_all: login
# Endpoints that contain login substring would match the above condition.
# Match Example - https://xyz.com/user/login
# Invalid Example - https://xyz.com/user/register
Example 2
Example for contains_all
url:
contains_all:
- https
- login
# Endpoints that contain both https and login substring would match the above condition.
# Match Example - https://xyz.com/user/login
# Invalid Example - http://xyz.com/user/login | https://xyz.com/user/register
👉🏻 In simple language: The above yaml syntax is filtering APIs with url containing the keywords ‘https’ and ‘login’

regex

Checks whether the parent property contains a match for the regex specified in the specified input. If input is an array, one of the regex input should have a match.
Example 1
Example for regex
request_payload:
contains_either: .*user*.
# If any part of request payload matches the above regex, it would be considered a match.
# Match Example - {”id”: 123, “data”:{”userName”: “abc”}} - userName is a valid match for above regex
# Invalid Example - {”id”: 123, “data”:{”name”: “abc”}} - no part of the request payload matches the above regex

eq

Checks whether the parent property is equal to the specified input.
Example 1
Example for eq
method:
eq: POST
# All the Post Endpoints will match the above condition.
# Match Example - POST https://xyz.com/getById
# Invalid Example - GET https://xyz.com/getById

gt

Checks whether the parent property is greater than the specified input.
Example 1
Example for gt
response_code:
gt: 204
# Endpoints with response greater than 204 will match the above condition.
# Match Example - Response codes like 205, 302
# Invalid Example - Response codes like 200, 201

gte

Checks whether the parent property is greater than or equal to the specified input.
Example 1
Example for gte
response_code:
gte: 204
# Endpoints with response greater than or equal to 204 will match the above condition.
# Match Example - Response codes like 204, 302
# Invalid Example - Response codes like 200, 201

lt

Checks whether the parent property is lesser than the specified input.
Example 1
Example for lt
response_code:
lt: 204
# Endpoints with response less than 204 will match the above condition.
# Match Example - Response codes like 200, 201
# Invalid Example - Response codes like 204, 205

lte

Checks whether the parent property is lesser than or equal to the specified input.
Example 1
response_code:
lte: 204
# Endpoints with response less than or equal to 204 will match the above condition.
# Match Example - Response codes like 200, 204
# Invalid Example - Response codes like 205, 302

not_contains

Checks whether the parent property does not contain the specified input. If input is an array, all of the input element should satisfy this condition.
Example 1
Example of not_contains
response_payload:
not_contains:
- "normal_user"
- "new"
# Response Payloads not containing strings ("normal_user", "new") will match the above condition.
Match Example for above
{"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "admin", "identifier": "old"}}
Invalid Example for above
1. {"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "normal_user", "identifier": "old"}}
2. {"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "admin", "identifier": "new"}}
3. {"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "normal_user", "identifier": "new"}}

not_contains_either

Checks whether the parent property does not contain the specified input. If input is an array, any one of the input element should satisfy this condition.
Example 1
Example of not_contains_either
response_payload:
not_contains_either:
- "normal_user"
- "new"
# Response Payloads which does not contain either ("normal_user") or ("new") will match the above condition.
# Match Example -
1. {"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "admin",
"identifier": "old"}}
2. {"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "normal_user",
"identifier": "old"}}
3. {"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "admin",
"identifier": "new"}}
# Invalid Example -
1. {"id": 100, "userdata": {"name": "xyz", "status": "normal_user",
"identifier": "new"}}

contains_jwt

Checks whether the parent property contains/not contains a JWT token.
Example 1
Example of contains_jwt
request_headers:
for_one:
value:
contains_jwt: true
# Request Headers which contain jwt token will match the above condition.
# Match Example -
1. Headers -
Content-Type: application/json
Authorization: <Bearer-Token>
# Invalid Example -
1. Headers -
Content-Type: application/json
Authorization: 23sdf234r3aaa

Collection Operators

These operators are useful for queries that involve individual keys and values in payloads and headers, rather than applying the condition to the entire payload as a string. To achieve the desired result, they must be combined with a data operator.

for_one

This collection operator is used to imply that either of key or value in the entire payload should satisfy the condition.
Example 1
Request Payload {”id”: 123, “data”:{”Username”: “abc”}}
Let’s say we want to check if there is a key present in request payload which contains name. We can represent that in the following yaml syntax -
Example of for_one
api_selection_filters:
request_payload:
for_one:
key:
contains_either: name
# ”for_one” here specified that the condition is applied on key.
# Data operand 'contains_either' checks whether any key in the request payload contains string (”name”)
👉🏻 In simple language: The above yaml syntax is filtering APIs with any key of the request payload containing the keyword ‘name’
Example 2
Request Payload {”id”: 123, ”status”: “admin”, “createdAt”: 1688364964}
Let’s say we want to check if there is a key present in request payload which is equal to status, and contains a value like (admin). We can represent that in the following yaml syntax -
Example of for_one
api_selection_filters:
request_payload:
for_one:
key:
eq: status
value:
regex: .*admin.*
# ”for_one” here specified that the condition is applied on both key and value.
# Data operand 'eq' checks whether any key in the request payload is exactly equalt to (”status”).
# Data operand 'regex' checks whether any value in the status key matches the provided regex.
👉🏻 In simple language: The above yaml syntax is filtering APIs with any key of the request payload equal to ‘status’ and the same key having value which matches specified regex.
Matching Payloads
  1. 1.
    {”id”: 123, ”status”: “admin”, “createdAt”: 1688364964}
  2. 2.
    {”status”: “administrator”, “active”: true}
  3. 3.
    {”userInfo”: {”name”: “testUser”, “status”: “admin”}, “lastLoginTs”: 1688364964}
Invalid Examples
  1. 1.
    {”id”: 123, “createdAt”: 1688364964}
  2. 2.
    {”id”: 123, ”status”: “normal”, “createdAt”: 1688364964}
  3. 3.
    {”id”: 123, ”access”: “admin”, “status”: “active”} Here key is named status, and a value matches regex .*admin*., but there is no single key value pair which satisfies both conditions.

Body Operators

These operators are useful for applying conditions specifically on request payload, response payload strings. To achieve the desired result, they must be combined with a data operator. Currently there are 2 types of body operators -

length

Length operator is used for applying conditions on the request/response payload length. Let’s explore this more through the below example
Examples of length
#Example 1
request_payload:
length:
gt: 0
# Here we want to apply a condition, where api's should have a non-empty request payload.
# We use length operator, and combine it with data operator(gt), where we specify length to be greater than 0
#Example 2
response_payload:
length:
gte: 10
# Here we want to apply a condition, where api's should have a non-empty response payload.
# We use length operator, and combine it with data operator(gt), where we specify length to be greater than equal to 10

percentage_match

Percentage Match operator is used for applying conditions on how similar sample response and test response are. Let’s explore this more through the below example
Example of percentage_match
#Example 1
response_payload:
percentage_match:
gt: 90
# Here we want to apply a condition, where we want to check that test response payload should be highly similar to sample response payload(i.e by more than 90%)
# We use percentage_match operator, and combine it with data operator(gt), where we specify percentage_match to be higher than 90

Extract Operators

These operators can be used to save parent entity’s value into a variable at any point during the api_selection_filters phase, which can be used later on in the test template yaml. Let’s see it in action in the below example -
Example of extract
#Example 1
url:
contains_either: https
extract: urlVar
# Here we have defined an extract operator, which will copy the complete url into a new variable named urlVar, in case the contains_either operand satisfies the condition
#Example 2
method:
extract: methodVar
# Here we have defined an extract operator, which will copy the http method values into a new variable named methodVar
We can also extract an individual key/value inside the parent entities like (request_payload, response_payload, request_headers, response_headers, query_params).
Example 1:
Request Payload** {”id”: 123, “data”:{”Username”: “abc”, "userStatus": "admin"}}
Example of extract
#request_payload:
for_one;
key:
contains_either: status
extract: keyVar
# Here we have defined an extract operator, which will copy the key("userStatus") into a new variable named keyVar, since ("userStatus") satisfies the contains_either operand. In simple words - keyVar = userStatus
Example 2
Request Payload** {”id”: 123, “data”:{”Username”: “abc”, "userStatus": "admin"}}
Example of extract
request_payload:
for_one;
key:
contains_either: status
extract: keyVar
value:
extract: valVar
# Here we have defined an extract operator, which will copy the key("userStatus") into a new variable named keyVar, since ("userStatus") satisfies the contains_either operand.
# We also defined a second extract operator inside value operand, which will copy the value associated with the matching key("userStatus") into the variable, i.e. ("admin").
# In other words - keyVar = userStatus, valVar = admin

Combining conditions using Boolean Operators

Security tests can be complex in nature. Often, a specific test requires multiple filter conditions to evaluate whether a given endpoint is eligible for the test.
Default Behavior
For a test to consider an endpoint valid, all conditions specified in the YAML template must be satisfied. By default, yaml considers and operator for all conditions. However, you can easily override this behavior using other boolean operators.
Boolean Operators
Boolean operators are of 2 types:

and

The and operator requires all of the specified conditions to be satisfied, which is also the default behavior. It can be applied on top of any operator, including data, collection, and parent operands.
Example 1
Example of and
#Test Description -
# condition 1: Consider only post endpoints.
# condition 2: Status code must be between 200-205(including both)
# condition 3: Request Headers should contain a header named origin.
# All conditions are mandatory.
api_selection_filters:
and:
- method:
eq: POST
- response_code:
and:
- gte: 200
- lte: 205
- request_headers:
for_one:
key:
eq: origin
Since applying and operator is default behaviour, we don’t need to explicitly write and operator. See below
Example of and
# removed 'AND' as it is default behavior
api_selection_filters:
method:
eq: POST
response_code:
gte: 200
lte: 205
request_headers:
for_one:
key:
eq: origin

or

The OR operator requires that at least one of the specified conditions is satisfied. It can be applied to any operator, including data, collection, and parent operands.
Example 1
Example of or
# Test Description
# condition 1: Status code must be equal to either 200 or 302
# condition 2: Request Headers should contain a header named origin.
# An endpoint should either satisfy either of the above two conditions
api_selection_filters:
or:
- response_code:
or:
- eq: 200
- eq: 302
- request_headers:
for_one:
key:
eq: origin
Last modified 7mo ago